Archive: June, 2016

Brexit-Induced Contract Uncertainty: What Can You Do Today?

The guessing game is over.  Brexit is official.

Pretty soon, the United Kingdom will no longer be a member of the European Union.  Which means that lawyers around the world are scratching their heads about what it means for their clients, their firm or their company.  Is it cause for panic, or a storm in a tea-cup?

One way to answer this question is to focus on what Brexit means for your existing contractual relationships. Which contract terms just became a whole lot fuzzier, and does it really matter?  Some have suggested that ambiguity around “English” governing law will complicate dispute resolution.  Others think that force majeure provisions may trigger a wave of unexpected contract termination.  But a more immediate concern may be the impact of Brexit on territorial rights and restraints in commercial agreements.

If a distribution agreement gives your company exclusive rights in the “European Union”, you may soon be losing a big chunk of your market.  If you have “European Union” non-compete language with a vendor, they might soon be free to set up shop in London.  And if you’ve agreed not to move data or assets outside of the EU, your British operations may no longer qualify.  In all scenarios, the first step is to find these potential problems and assess how painful they are.  From there you can devise a strategy of renegotiating, repapering or restructuring before Brexit officially kicks in.

Of course, those of you with Exari Contracts have already done all this analysis and can enjoy a few days off at the beach.  Perhaps a nice beach somewhere in Europe, while you still have the chance.


Jamie Wodetzki is Exari’s Co-founder and Chief Product Officer. Reach out to him in the comments section.

Beyond Compliance: Moving towards an Enterprise Level View of Risk

This week, DerivSource interviewed Alexandre Bon, Senior Solution Architect at Murex, to discuss the growing needs of an Enterprise View of Data in Financial Service firms. He explains how it is essential in order to comply with both the FRTB and SA-CCR requirements, as firms need full visibility into client and trade data. By concluding Bon’s Q&A, here are the important steps you need to be aware of and follow in order to better comply with these regulations.

1. Improving communication between all departments will build a better enterprise view of risk and capital

By bringing departments together with full transparency into all information, regulation-related strategic decisions can be more efficiently built out. For example, by bringing together the credit, collateral management, treasury and trading departments, will link together how collateral management operates and how trading desks will price the effect collateralization of new transactions. In return, this will provide traders with the information they need to efficiently evaluate which entity they should execute a trade with.

Bon stresses the importance of full transparency into all data at an enterprise level view. Banks need to move to a real time view of their regulatory capital positions in order to properly comply with the FRTB.

2. The SA-CCR has an implementation deadline for many firms

The new standardized approach is scheduled to take effect January 1, 2017. This includes a comprehensive approach for measuring counterparty credit risk associated with OTC derivatives, exchange-traded derivatives and long settled transactions. For more information on what you need to consider in order to comply, you can find it here.

Since a deadline is quickly approaching, more and more firms are beginning to put budgets into place to either build their own system or evaluating enterprise solutions for adoption (take a read through our Build vs. Buy whitepaper for more information).

3. How to integrate departments and getting over that initial challenge “hump”

Integrating departments can be extremely difficult, as further discussed by Bon. It’s no surprise that he mentions the challenges that firms will face, such as how they all operate and run differently, their data sets are incompatible or out date or can be duplicated with inconsistencies. The worst of it- they have no central data repository. He mentions that some firms have built their own regulatory reporting systems on top of data warehouses, but they just don’t cut it.

Implementing a central data repository to allow for full visibility into all data and reporting for every department is essential. It will help establish clear data management processes for maintaining clear, consistent data across the entire enterprise. By moving toward an enterprise view, the information can be used to rationalize processes, understand which businesses are most profitable, and divest those that are not.

Firms will not only be in compliance, but looking further ahead they can develop enterprise-level risk tools for analyzing positions and capital data in a much more efficient way. Banks need to adopt a more innovative approach for dealing with the high cost of regulations, such as managing the total cost of trading. An Enterprise Contract Management System is just that approach.

To learn more about how an enterprise contract management system can help you reduce your firm’s risk, download our Contract Risk Playbook: Risks Hiding in Plain View, an advanced guide for corporate boards and senior executives today.


DerivSource is an independent information source and online community for OTC derivatives professionals globally, with a community of over 15,000 members globally.  

*DerivSource, SA0CCR and FRTB: Compliance Drives Renewed Push for Enterprise Data Management. 2016.

The Changing Role of Compliance within Financial Services Firms

It was a beautiful afternoon in Boston as Chief Compliance Officers from the area convened to discuss the changing role of compliance at their financial services firms.  The venue, Top of the Hub, is situated at the highest point in Boston – amazingly appropriate given the conversation quickly gravitated towards visibility and the difficulty of transforming ISDA Masters & CSA’s into data that can be more easily analyzed and operationalized.

Conversation was lively with several topics resonating with all participants.  A significant theme of the conversation was around the changing role of compliance within the business.  Compliance leaders are now asked to sit at the negotiation table with clients and have become a key member of the team.   With the regulators playing a more resident role in corporations, compliance has become a more visible component of daily activities.  There was a general theme that the integration of compliance into the business functions has also integrated the role of Chief Compliance Officer.

When speaking about ISDA Master Agreements, many felt that this was an area for ongoing automation and restructuring.  Specifically, the harmonization of the ISDA-related data would reduce cost and risk for many firms.  The advent of tools in this area is an opportunity for the teams to improve their process.  The process of collecting the ISDA detail is very manual today. Once automated, however, this data would better enable companies to address questions regarding most favored nation clauses and other contract call outs.

The general consensus is that there are many regulations for the buy side firms to cover. It is easy for things to fall through the cracks as many companies cannot cover all regulations with a SME.   The attendees discussed that the maturing of the processes was key to success, with several recommendations offered.  Three of these suggestions included:

  1. lobby ISDA collectively to request more structure,
  2. designate key staff members to be SMEs in areas of greatest concern and,
  3. agree on a standard CSA

The attendees discussed how to best direct their limited resources, thus being a main concern. One recommendation was to provide incentives to the organization for meeting guidelines.  A detailed conversation was held recommending teams to review the operations logs on a regular basis to spot check for any opportunities open for improvement.  

Firms at the table had many different types of risk: fiduciary vs. deposit risk, while some companies were faced with both risks and answered to multiple regulatory bodies, that often had conflicting recommendation or reporting.  Additionally, the impact of international regulation was discussed as an area of rapid change that is also causing workload on these teams.  

Overall, there seemed to be consensus about ways to improve:

  1. Implement a central repository for all important agreements
  2. Capture key contract terms related to risk and compliance
  3. Provide proactive visibility for business users that quantify the indicators they find most valuable

The event ended strong with many of the participants exchanging cards and committing to continued sharing of best practices.  Many thanks to the participants for such a lively discussion and to Exari for hosting an amazing event!

9.thumbnail Patricia Flynn is a Compliance/Big Data Consultant. Reach out in the comments or on her Linkedin .