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Legal Technology Glossary: 17 Terms Explained

Legal Technology Glossary: 17 Terms Explained

July 22, 2010 Dahna Ori Contract Management  

Sometimes, talking about technology feels like speaking (or listening to) a foreign language, and you're just not sure you quite understand what's going on.

To try to help, below is a glossary of 17 commonly used legal technology terms defined in plain English.

Knowledge Management (KM): Succinctly put, KM is the process through which organizations generate value from their intellectual and knowledge-based assets. Most often, generating value from such assets involves codifying what employees, partners and customers know, and sharing that information among employees, departments and even with other companies in an effort to devise best practices. More…

Document Assembly: Every document created by a law firm or legal department is “assembled” as the product of a discrete set of questions and answers used to guide the appropriate language for the document. Document assembly (1) codifies the questions, (2) structures the answers, and (3) rationalizes the outputs. By building a branching “decision-tree” out of hundreds of potential questions, an automated system can achieve the same (or better results) in a fraction of the time. More…

Document Assembly System: allows business people to create contracts using a repository of pre-approved alternative clauses, rather than cutting and pasting from old contracts or creating new language themselves. This speeds up the sales process, and allows the law department to manage legal risk without getting involved in reviewing individual contracts. More…

Template: A template is a file that serves as a starting point for a new document. When you open a template, it is pre-formatted in some way. For example, you might use template that is formatted as a business letter. The template would likely have a space for your name and address in the upper left corner, an area for the recipient's address a little below that on the left site, an area for the message body below that, and a spot for your signature at the bottom. More…

Electronic Discovery: Discovery is the term used for the initial phase of litigation where the parties in a dispute are required to provide each other relevant information and records, along with all other evidence related to the case. In 2006 amendments to the US Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, codified the requirement to provide electronic information and records, referred to as electronically stored information (ESI). These changes brought about the term eDiscovery or Electronic Discovery and includes all electronic information. More…

Legacy System: Legacy systems utilize outmoded programming languages, software and/or hardware that typically are no longer supported by the respective vendors. Legacy systems persist because of the expense, effort and potential risk of business interruption associated with the movement of data and key business processes to more advanced and contemporary technologies. More…

Data Repository: a logical (and sometimes physical) partitioning of data where multiple databases which apply to specific applications or sets of applications reside. More…

Document Management System: controls the life cycle of documents in your organization — how they are created, reviewed, and published, and how they are ultimately disposed of or retained. More…

Application Integration: (sometimes called enterprise application integration or EAI) is the process of bringing data or a function from one application program together with that of another application program.More…

Contract Lifecycle Management: a systematic process for the creation, execution, compliance, and analysis of corporate contracts for the purpose of reducing costs, maximizing operational efficiency, and minimizing risk. More…

Application Service Provider (ASP): a business that offers software services to customers, using computer networks and the Internet as the mechanism to deliver and manage the service. More…

Extensible Markup Language (XML): XML is a markup language for documents containing structured information. Structured information contains both content and some indication of what role that content plays (for example, content in a section heading has a different meaning from content in a footnote) A markup language is a mechanism to identify structures in a document. The XML specification defines a standard way to add markup to documents. More…

Semantic Tag/Markup: When you format text to be printed (or displayed on a computer or TV), you need to distinguish between the text itself and the instructions for printing the text. The markup is the instructions for the text. Markup can also indicate information about the text. More…

Application Programming Interface (API): a set of routines, protocols, and tools for building software applications. A good API makes it easier to develop a program by providing all the building blocks. A programmer then puts the blocks together. More…

Workflow: a term used to describe the tasks, procedural steps, people, systems, inputs and outputs of information in a business process. More…

Cloud Computing: Cloud computing describes a new supplement, consumption, and delivery model for IT services based on the Internet, and it typically involves over-the-Internet provision of dynamically scalable and often virtualized resources. More…

Software as a Service (SaaS): a software distribution model in which applications are hosted by a vendor or service provider and made available to customers over a network, typically the Internet. More…

What terms/definitions would you add to this list?

dahna

Dahna Ori is Exari’s Digital Marketing Specialist. Reach out on twitter @ExariDahna